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dc.contributor.authorKipnis, Daniel G.
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-25T21:43:23Z
dc.date.available2022-08-25T21:43:23Z
dc.date.issued2022-07-29
dc.identifier.other10.6084/m9.figshare.20377293.v1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12588/1111
dc.description.abstractI will share select survey results from professors and academic librarians on their use of pirate websites. With the never-ending rising cost of academic journal subscriptions, shrinking library budgets and a need for accessing full-text literature in order to conduct research and apply for grants; pirate websites have become an alternative means for accessing scientific paywalled literature. Sci-hub is the most popular global pirate website and continues to face legal challenges. My research gathered feedback from academic librarians and professors to see if pirate websites are being discussed and or taught in higher education, as well as personal usage and general knowledge of pirate websites. My responses are from academics in STEM and I’ll conclude my talk with some recommendations for addressing pirate sites in the academy.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectSTEMen_US
dc.subjectSTEM librarianshipen_US
dc.subjectSci-Huben_US
dc.subjectpirate websitesen_US
dc.subjectLibGenen_US
dc.subjectZlibraryen_US
dc.subjectrecommendationsen_US
dc.titleSelect survey results from academic librarians and professors on teaching and using pirate websitesen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.description.departmentLibraryen_US


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Attribution 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 3.0 United States