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dc.contributor.authorMendoza, Sylvia
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T20:54:47Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T20:54:47Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationMendoza, S. (2014). The Adelante Oral History Project as a site of decolonial potential in transforming school curriculum. Regeneración Tlacuilolli: UCLA Raza Studies Journal, 1(1), 11-26.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2371-9575
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12588/197
dc.descriptionPublished version available at https://escholarship.org/uc/item/18z22942#main.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes the decolonial potential of an oral history project based out of a predominantly Latina/o and low-income elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah. Considering the history of colonizing school curriculums, practices, and institutions that marginalize students of color, this paper applies a lens of decoloniality (Anzaldúa, 1999; Fanon, 2008; Dei, Mazzuca, Melsaac, & Zine, 1997;Villenas, 2010) to understand how alternative educational projects can disrupt colonizing school curriculums to improve and enhance the educational experience of Latina/o elementary students.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUCLA Journalsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRegeneración Tlacuilolli: UCLA Raza Studies Journal;Volume 1, Issue 1
dc.titleThe Adelante Oral History Project: A Site of Decolonial Potential in Transforming School Curriculumen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentRace, Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (REGSS)en_US


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