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dc.contributor.authorBartkowski, John P.
dc.contributor.authorXu, Xiaohe
dc.contributor.authorBartkowski, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-19T15:12:31Z
dc.date.available2021-04-19T15:12:31Z
dc.date.issued1/9/2019
dc.identifierdoi: 10.3390/rel10010037
dc.identifier.citationReligions 10 (1): 37 (2019)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12588/433
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has linked parental religiosity to a number of positive developmental characteristics in young children. This study introduces the concept of selective sanctification as a refinement to existing theory and, in doing so, adds to a small but growing body of longitudinal research on this topic. We explore how parents’ religious attendance (for fathers, mothers, and couples) and the household religious environment (parent–child religious discussions, spousal conflicts over religion) influence child development among third-graders. Analyses of longitudinal data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS)-Kindergarten Cohort reveal a mix of salutary (beneficial) and adverse (detrimental) developmental outcomes based on teachers’ ratings and standardized test performance scores. Third-graders’ psychological adjustment and social competence are enhanced by various religious factors, but students’ performance on reading, math, and science tests is hampered by several forms of parental religiosity. We discuss the implications of these findings and suggest several avenues for future research.
dc.titleMixed Blessing: The Beneficial and Detrimental Effects of Religion on Child Development among Third-Graders
dc.date.updated2021-04-19T15:12:32Z
dc.description.departmentSociology


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