Show brief item record

dc.contributor.authorBeckelheimer, Teresa
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-01T15:49:00Z
dc.date.available2021-12-01T15:49:00Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12588/751
dc.description.abstractAfricans enslaved during the transatlantic slave trade not only lost their families, their friends, their homes, they also lost their identity. Forced onto ships in tight quarters, these men and women of Africa were stripped of their clothes, their belongings, and their existence as Africans and taken to a foreign land and sold as slaves. They were forced to create a new identity in a new world, shaping their new lives through a collective memory of all that they lost. This article looks at the way DNA is helping the descendants of enslaved Africans reconnect to a lost past and contribute to the African Diaspora.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Texas at San Antonio, College of Liberal and Fine Artsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBeyond Boundaries
dc.titleAfrican Identity and the African Diaspora: The Genetic Impact of the Transatlantic Slave Tradeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.description.departmentHistoryen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show brief item record