Intimate partner violence against married women in Uganda: Integrating resource and gender theories

Date
2011
Authors
Ogland, Emmanuelle Goncalves de Souza
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Abstract

The following thesis examines correlates of the lifetime experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) against married women in Uganda. As domestic violence against women in this East African country becomes a prevalent social and public health problem, a more systematic sociological investigation is warranted. Using data from the 2006 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey, this study investigates three different forms of IPV: (1) physical violence, (2) emotional or psychological violence, and (3) sexual violence. Guided by an integrated theoretical framework that synthesizes resource and gender theories, five hypotheses are developed and tested. Results from multivariate statistical analyses indicate that both resource and gender factors are the strongest predictors of the lifetime experience of violence among married Ugandan women.

Description
This item is available only to currently enrolled UTSA students, faculty or staff. To download, navigate to Log In in the top right-hand corner of this screen, then select Log in with my UTSA ID.
Keywords
Africa, Family Violence, Intimate Partner Violence, Uganda
Citation
Department
Sociology