International students' adjustment: meaning in life, academic stress and positive affect

Date
2015
Authors
Henri, Maria
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
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Abstract

The number of international college students in the United States has sharply increased over the past decade. Despite the increase, investigations of international students' adjustment remain scarce. Most of the existing research focuses on international students' vulnerability to maladjustment. However, a growing body of literature has been addressing resilience in this population. Previous research suggests that international students may be resilient to the acculturative stressors they face as they begin their educational experience in a different country. Data collected from 146 international and domestic students indicated that international students reported significantly higher presence of meaning in their lives. Furthermore, higher presence of meaning in life predicted higher positive affect, and lower academic stress. Propensity score matching was utilized to account for self-selection, based on a set of demographics variables, characteristics and traits. The results provide insight into potential sources of resilience for college students.

Description
This item is available only to currently enrolled UTSA students, faculty or staff.
Keywords
academic stress, adjustment, college, international students, meaning in life, positive affect
Citation
Department
Psychology