The Gendered, the Classed, and the Raced: Social-Spatial Visualization of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Texas, USA

Date

2022

Authors

Yates, Joshua Thomas

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Abstract

The purpose of this thesis is to highlight the disproportional impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on minority groups in Texas, United State. This thesis relies on a mixed-method approach of using digital ethnographic work as well as spatial-statistical analysis of quantitative data. This thesis is divided into two essays: 1- A published book chapter and 2- An under-review peer-reviewed journal article. In the book chapter, I focus on the disproportional afflictions experienced by working immigrant mothers in Texas. Women's economic, social, and productive lives have been affected disproportionately and differently from men. I draw on in-depth zoom and phone interviews of 41 working mothers from diverse ethnicities, family arrangements, and professions. The findings highlights the socio-spatial stories of minority women whose contributions to the family and to society have been often ignored in this crisis. I contend how the lack of gender lens put women, especially minority women in this study who are already vulnerable, at more risk. In the journal article, I will offer a socio-spatial illustration of how the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically made the unequal accessibilities of healthcare facilities, particularly the vaccination sites, more visible in the state of Texas. Geographic Information System (GIS) and R spatial analysis techniques are used to illustrate the unequal access to vaccination sites in five central Texas counties along the I-35 corridor. Findings emphasize the interconnected roles of racial, ethnicity, social and economic class classifications demographic variables play in (in) access to COVID-19 vaccination sites.

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Keywords

COVID-19, Gender, Intersectionality, Race, Texas, Coronavirus disease 2019, GIS, Geographic Information Systems

Citation

Department

Political Science and Geography