Mindfulness, the Working Alliance, and Client Outcomes

dc.contributor.advisorJuhnke, Gerald
dc.contributor.authorAvera, Joseph E.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMoyer, Michael S.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSchutz, Paul
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRobertson, Derek
dc.creator.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8175-0775
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-25T22:33:19Z
dc.date.available2024-01-25T22:33:19Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.descriptionThis item is available only to currently enrolled UTSA students, faculty or staff. To download, navigate to Log In in the top right-hand corner of this screen, then select Log in with my UTSA ID.
dc.description.abstractCommon Factors research has identified the therapeutic alliance as one of the most influential contributors to positive client outcomes. To be present with and fully focused on clients are two robust contributors to a strong therapeutic alliance. Counselors-in-training however are generally trained to execute specific skills. Skills, are viewed by new counselors-in-training as things to do to clients in session vis-à-vis ways to be in session. Helping counselors-in-training develop their ability to be present with clients without feeling the reactive need to interject counseling skills may better therapeutic alliances and providing more effective counseling treatment outcomes. Students in other helping professions report mindfulness meditation practices contribute to feeling more comfortable with clients. Mindfulness meditation develops greater awareness of clients’ needs. This researcher examined counselor mindfulness practices. The study utilized clients’ treatment outcomes and working alliance perceptions. Using a quasi-experimental study, this researcher attempted to capture and explain client reported differences between mindfulness vs. non-mindfulness counselor groups, and the potential significance resulting from these differences. Participants were master’s level counselors-in-training enrolled in a practicum course. The program offering the practicum course was a Counsel for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP) accredited university in the southwest United States. The researcher measured the relationship between the Counselor-In-Training mindfulness practices, and changes in client reported counseling outcomes over the treatment course. Data was analyzed using a Repeated Measures Multivariate Linear mixed model, a specific form of linear mixed modeling analysis. Findings, implications, and future research recommendations are presented and discussed.
dc.description.departmentCounseling
dc.format.extent158 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.isbn9780355533163
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12588/2413
dc.languageen
dc.subjectClient Outcomes
dc.subjectCounseling
dc.subjectCounselor Education
dc.subjectMindfulness
dc.subjectTherapeutic Alliance
dc.subjectWorking Alliance
dc.subject.classificationCounseling psychology
dc.subject.classificationMental health
dc.subject.classificationCognitive psychology
dc.titleMindfulness, the Working Alliance, and Client Outcomes
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.dcmiText
dcterms.accessRightspq_closed
thesis.degree.departmentCounseling
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at San Antonio
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy

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