Using technology to teach English language learners: beliefs on digital access and efficacy

Date
2015
Authors
Salazar, Maria Elena
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Abstract

This study examines teachers' beliefs about technological access in the classroom and teaching efficacy toward the use of technology for bilingual learners. An exploratory survey was conducted with 161 bilingual education (BE) and English as a second language (ESL) teachers to explore the following research questions: (1) What are the teachers' beliefs about digital access and their teaching efficacy toward the use of technology for bilingual learners? (2) Is there a statistically significant relationship between demographic characteristics and teachers' beliefs about digital access and teaching efficacy toward the use of technology with bilingual learners? The findings suggest that teachers consider themselves capable of meeting the linguistic challenges of using technology and of resourcing or acquiring technology for their students to use. The data suggests that teachers who frequently use the Internet for entertainment and communication (personal reasons) outside of the school environment exhibit a high degree of confidence using technology (digital efficacy) in the classroom. Data also suggests that teaching in preparation for participation in the broader society is supported by the correspondents' agreement with the use of technology skills for applications beyond the classroom.

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Keywords
Bilingual education, Efficacy, English language
Citation
Department
Bicultural-Bilingual Studies