'Thank Heaven, I Am an Indian': Persona, Authenticity, and Hybridity in the Writing of Kah-Ge-Ga-Gah-Bowh Alias 'George Copway'

dc.contributor.advisorSinanan, Kerry
dc.contributor.authorBombardier, Brandon
dc.contributor.committeeMemberArdoin, Paul
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPortillo, Annette
dc.creator.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-8858-4770
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-09T19:30:02Z
dc.date.available2024-02-09T19:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.descriptionThis item is available only to currently enrolled UTSA students, faculty or staff. To download, navigate to Log In in the top right-hand corner of this screen, then select Log in with my UTSA ID.
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis I examine Ojibwe autobiographer George Copway as an 'urban Indian' navigating his place in the anglophone, white majority populace of the mid-nineteenth century United States. This approach considers metropolitan pressures as historical contexts for his self- representation, rather than examining them as proof of some sort of ethno-cultural duplicity. My intention is not to champion emigration from tribal lands, it is only to argue that moving away from tribal land does not, indeed cannot, constitute a betrayal of some authentic ideal that was denied to Native peoples by settler culture. This paper proposes that Copway's socio-ethnic hybridity as Christian Anglophone writer and Ojibwe tribesman are inextricable components of a nuanced Indian identity, allowing him to exist in and simultaneously navigate both spheres.
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.format.extent52 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.isbn9798617029514
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12588/3032
dc.languageen
dc.subjecthybridity
dc.subjectidentity
dc.subjectnarrative persona
dc.subjectNative American autobiography
dc.subjectNative American Christianity
dc.subjectUrban Indian
dc.subject.classificationLiterature
dc.subject.classificationNative American studies
dc.subject.classificationCanadian literature
dc.title'Thank Heaven, I Am an Indian': Persona, Authenticity, and Hybridity in the Writing of Kah-Ge-Ga-Gah-Bowh Alias 'George Copway'
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.dcmiText
dcterms.accessRightspq_closed
thesis.degree.departmentEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at San Antonio
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts

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