The role of motivation and the university environment curriculum in Latino firsts completing bachelor's degrees in education

Date
2014
Authors
Nelson, Roxanna M.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to discover opportunities in the University Environment Curriculum that support the motivation of Latino Firsts to complete a Bachelor's degree in Education. To do so, I proposed three research questions, which address motivational factors of Latino Firsts in completing a Bachelor's degrees in Education, supportive opportunities in the University Environment Curriculum, and additional opportunities that might be institutionalized to assist in degree completion for Latino Firsts. In understanding the complexities associated with these research questions, I chose to use a qualitative singular case study methodology with four embedded cases to best answer the research questions. After selecting participants, I collected data in three phases, which included interviews and participant-created artifacts along with information about the current opportunities in the University Environment Curriculum. The findings, relayed in chapter four, first address each case individually and conclude with findings that emerged from analysis of the singular Case of Latino Firsts pursuing Bachelor's degrees in Education. These findings illuminated four themes, which were the importance of relationships, identity, university context and financial stability. The discussion chapter relates the findings back to the interdisciplinary theoretical frame, and current literature of Latino Firsts and the University Environment Curriculum. Then, implications for researchers, practitioners and policy-makers based on these findings are explained. Limitations and future research agenda possibilities end the document.

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Keywords
Education, First-generation college students, Hispanic serving institution, Latino students, Preservice teachers, Self-determination theory, University environment curriculum
Citation
Department
Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching