A replication of the Confluence Model of Sexual Aggression

Date
2015
Authors
Ralston, Brooke Aileen Martinez
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Abstract

Much IPV research focuses on correlates of violent behaviors as opposed to causal models. However, a few models have been proposed. One such model is the Confluence Model of Sexual Aggression developed by Malamuth, Sockloskie, Koss, and Tanaka (1991). The confluence model was designed to determine if men's sexual and nonsexual aggression could be traced back to various developmental and environmental factors such as interactions with parents and presence in a delinquent environment. A number of replications have been carried out to further predict male aggression as well as nonviolent concepts such as misperception of sexual interest as Jacques-Tiura, Abbey, Parkhill, and Zawacki (2007) did. The current study was designed to use parts of the confluence model of sexual aggression individually to predict IPV in college students. Figure 1 contains an illustration of the model. Participants (N=326) 17 to 46 years old were recruited through the SONA system for credit for their introductory psychology class. Surveys assessed IPV perpetration, attitudes toward violence, hostility toward women, and impersonal sex. Results indicated hostility toward women was associated with increased IPV perpetration in women; attitudes toward violence was associated with increased IPV perpetration in both men and women; impersonal sex was associated with increased IPV perpetration in men; attitudes toward violence were associated with hostility toward women in men; and impersonal sex was associated with increased IPV perpetration in both men and women. These results provide information about various risk factors for IPV perpetration in men and women. In addition, they inform prevention and intervention programs.

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This item is available only to currently enrolled UTSA students, faculty or staff.
Keywords
Aggression, Confluence, Replication
Citation
Department
Psychology