Psychosocial Predictors of Current Counseling/Therapy Use in College Students

Date
2019
Authors
Rouska, Ashton
Knight, Cory
Soto, Andrew
McNaughton-Cassill, Mary
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Office of the Vice President for Research
Abstract

Findings from the Center of Collegiate Mental Health (2017) suggest that anxiety and depression are the most prevalent psychosocial stressors affecting college students today. Other frequently reported problems include general stress (Beiter et al., 2015), difficulty sleeping (Gress‐Smith, Roubinov, Andreotti, Compas, & Luecken, 2015), homesickness (Sun & Hagedorn, 2016), and in some cases, suicidal behavior (Milazzo-Sayre, McKeon, & Hughes, 2016). Protective factors such as a supportive university environment might increase counseling attendance (Prince, 2015), but additional research is needed. Finally, demographic factors might contribute to current counseling/therapy use in a meaningful way (Wang & Castañeda‐Sound, 2008). The aim of the current study is to examine which psychosocial stressors increase the likelihood of college students attending counseling/therapy. We hypothesized that students with depression or anxiety would be the most likely to currently use counseling/therapy services, followed by insomnia, homesickness, stress, and suicidal behavior. Finally, students who felt supported by their university environment, would be more likely to use counseling/therapy.

Description
Keywords
Citation
Department
Psychology