Show brief item record

dc.contributor.authorCorgnet, Brice
dc.contributor.authorHernán-González, Roberto
dc.contributor.authorMcCarter, Matthew W.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-19T14:59:04Z
dc.date.available2021-04-19T14:59:04Z
dc.date.issued11/5/2015
dc.identifierdoi: 10.3390/g6040588
dc.identifier.citationGames 6 (4): 588-603 (2015)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12588/350
dc.description.abstractA burgeoning problem facing organizations is the loss of workgroup productivity due to cyberloafing. The current paper examines how changes in the decision-making rights about what workgroup members can do on the job affect cyberloafing and subsequent work productivity. We compare two different types of decision-making regimes: autocratic decision-making and group voting. Using a laboratory experiment to simulate a data-entry organization, we find that, while autocratic decision-making and group voting regimes both curtail cyberloafing (by over 50%), it is only in group voting that there is a substantive improvement (of 38%) in a cyberloafer’s subsequent work performance. Unlike autocratic decision-making, group voting leads to workgroups outperforming the control condition where cyberloafing could not be stopped. Additionally, only in the group voting regime did production levels of cyberloafers and non-loafers converge over time.
dc.titleThe Role of the Decision-Making Regime on Cooperation in a Workgroup Social Dilemma: An Examination of Cyberloafing
dc.date.updated2021-04-19T14:59:04Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show brief item record