Are antioxidants related to adiposity and inflammation in a sample of non-smoking men and women from the U.S. population?

Date
2012
Authors
Aguilar, Rosalie P.
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Abstract

Due to the increased risk obese individuals have for developing chronic diseases it is important to determine whether antioxidant status is related to adiposity.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using information from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Approximately 3,755 non-smoking individuals ages of 20-69 were included in the study. Percentage of total body adiposity and trunk adiposity were analyzed in t-tests, ANOVA, correlation analysis, and linear multiple regressions along with serum antioxidants vitamin C, alpha-tocopherol, and beta-carotene. Hierarchical regressions were conducted to determine if antioxidants act as a mediator in the relationship of adiposity with C-reactive protein (CRP).

Results: A positive relationship was observed for alpha-tocopherol and measurements of adiposity. Vitamin C and beta-carotene demonstrated negative relationships with increased levels of adiposity. Levels of serum antioxidants were greater for individuals who reported taking antioxidant supplements. Women who reported taking vitamin C or E supplements had lower levels of adiposity compared to those not taking supplements. Hierarchical regressions found that beta-carotene attenuated the effect of adiposity on levels of CRP in men.

Conclusion: Dietary intake of antioxidants should be assessed in future studies and intake from supplements should be quantified. Further investigation is warranted to determine if consumption of beta-carotene offers a protective effect against inflammation.

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Keywords
Adiposity, Alpha-tocopherol, Antioxidants, Beta-carotene, Inflammation, Vitamin C
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Department
Health and Kinesiology